Skip to main content
Home » Eye Exam Q&A » Common Tests » Eye Dilation

Eye Dilation

A  comprehensive eye exam can include eye dilation—the addition of special eye drops that “open up” the pupil at the front of the eyeball. This allows for a maximum amount of light to enter the eyeball, giving your eye doctor a better view of the internal structures of your eyes.
 
Eye dilation is common during an eye exam after preliminary testing of visual acuity, pressure testing, and any vision-correction measurements have been taken. 
 
Eyecare professionals agree: eye dilation is an important component of an eye exam especially when there are symptoms of potential eye disease like macular degeneration, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma, cataracts and more.

Anything else I should know?

Having your eyes dilated doesn’t hurt—it just feels a little strange. Your pupil at the front of your eye automatically adjusts to light intensity, closing when light is more intense, and opening in lower lighting conditions—much like an automatic camera adjusts to take photos indoors or outdoors.
 
The drops used to dilate your eyes don’t wear off immediately, that’s why it’s recommended you bring sunwear with you to a comprehensive eye exam. And if you’re driving, you may want to consider having a friend with you to help you drive home, or assist you if you feel slightly disoriented.
 
(Remember, your eyes won’t automatically adjust to changing light conditions until the drops wear off.)
 
 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

Check out our VIRTUAL Frame Gallery & try on some frames!